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Posts Tagged ‘HowTo’

HowTo: round a number up to N decimal digits in Javascript

Was just trying to round-off some Google Maps coordinates for display in Javascript up to 3 decimal digits and that was a bit like a blast from the past (the end of the ‘90s to be more accurate)…

So here’s my contributed answer at:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2221167/javascript-formatting-a-rounded-number-to-n-decimals

This works for rounding to N digits (if you just want to truncate to N digits remove the Math.round call and use the Math.trunc one):

function roundN(value, digits) {
   var tenToN = 10 ** digits;
   return /*Math.trunc*/(Math.round(value * tenToN)) / tenToN;
}

Had to resort to such logic at Java in the past when I was authoring data manipulation E-Slate components. That is since I had found out that adding 0.1 many times to 0 you’d end up with some unexpectedly long decimal part (this is due to floating point arithmetics).

A user comment at Format number to always show 2 decimal places calls this technique scaling.

Some mention there are cases that don’t round as expected and at http://www.jacklmoore.com/notes/rounding-in-javascript/ this is suggested instead:

function round(value, decimals) {
  return Number(Math.round(value+'e'+decimals)+'e-'+decimals);
}

image

HowTo: Use latest C# features in MVC5 Razor views (.cshtml)

Having recently updated an ASP.net MVC web app from MVC4 to MVC5 and from .NET 4.5 to .NET 4.7.2 I was expecting Razor views (.cshtml files) to use the latest C# compiler, especially since at Properties/Build/Advanced option for the web project one read “C# latest major version (default)”.

However that was not the case and trying to use newer C# language features like the ?. ternary conditional operator or interpolated strings (or nameof etc.) would show errors like

Feature ‘interpolated strings’ is not available in C# 5. Please use language version 6 or greater.

Luckily there is a workaround for using the latest C# compiler in MVC5. Just need to add the NuGet package https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.CodeDom.Providers.DotNetCompilerPlatform/ to one’s project as explained at https://dusted.codes/using-csharp-6-features-in-aspdotnet-mvc-5-razor-views. Alternatively one could move their project to ASP.net Core, which is a more drastic move though.

After doing it I started seeing Intellisense issues in .cshtml like:

The type ‘Expression<>’ is defined in an assembly that is not referenced. You must add a reference to assembly ‘System.Core …

Tried to add the System.Core assembly to the project, but wasn’t allowed (it said the Build system was adding it). Adding System.Core as a NuGet package would mean moving to .NET Core which I wasn’t ready to try with that project yet.

Seems there was an easy solution to that, just closed and reopened the Visual Studio solution and did a Rebuild and all was fine after that.

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How-to: get int value via ADO.net SqlDataReader using column name

Based on Sam Holder’s answer at https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7388475/reading-int-values-from-sqldatareader/54296026, just contributed an extension method for fetching Int32 values via ADO.net’s SqlDataReader, without jumping through hoops (aka first fetch column ordinal [number] by name, then fetching the int value passing the column ordinal).

Would be nice if Microsoft was providing such things out of the box.

namespace adonet.extensions
{
  public static class AdonetExt
  {
    public static int GetInt32(this SqlDataReader reader, string columnName)
    {
      return reader.GetInt32(reader.GetOrdinal(columnName));
    }
  }
}

and use it like this

using adonet.extensions;

//…

int farmsize = reader.GetInt32("farmsize");

assuming there is no GetInt32(string) already in SqlDataReader – if there is any, just use some other method name instead

HowTo: change color of validation messages in ASP.net MVC

If you need to customize the colors (or do more restyling) of validation messages in ASP.net MVC, the following snippet from a discussion on ASP.net forums should be useful:

Add to Content/Site.css:

/* styles for validation helpers */

.field-validation-error {
    color: #b94a48;
}

.field-validation-valid {
    display: none;
}

input.input-validation-error {
    border: 1px solid #b94a48;
}

select.input-validation-error {
    border: 1px solid #b94a48;
}

input[type="checkbox"].input-validation-error {
    border: 0 none;
}

.validation-summary-errors {
    color: #b94a48;
}

.validation-summary-valid {
    display: none;
}

Other useful replies from there:

@Html.ValidationSummary(true,"",new {@style= "color: red"})

The method for MVC 5 + Bootstrap is:
@Html.ValidationSummary(true, "", new { @class = "text-danger" })

HowTo: Fix DVD/CD with Live filesystem (Packet/UDF) on Windows

The other day I found how easy it is to use a Live CD/DVD (where packet writing occurs when adding stuff) instead of a Mastered one (where all is kept to be written when you close the disk) on Windows.

It feels more like using a USB flash disk and should be more safe regarding losing data in the long run if you want to keep some file archive. In theory at least, since there are cases the live disk last write operation may fail and it may appear as an unreadable disk after one, making funny noises when you insert it and freezing for long time periods Windows Explorer when you try to access it.

However, the UDF filesystem that it uses keeps multiple VAT tables for the blocks written to the disk, which means it can be restored to the last workable state of the disk (you might still lose data from the last block I guess, but you’ll have access to the rest of the files you had written to the disk). For any files you find missing, you can try file recovery software with deep search option, like ISOBuster.

To restore such a disk back to working state, on Windows 10 you can right click the Start menu button and from the context (popup) menu shown, you can select to run PowerShell as Administrator. Then you can write CMD and press ENTER. The classic command-line shell (DOS syntax) will open up, where you should type-in chkdsk /f e: (replacing e: with the letter of the drive where the problematic disk has been inserted – can find that one easily from Windows Explorer / My Computer) and press ENTER again.

The disk should be detected as being of UDF format and the disk checking (chkdsk) command will check for a valid VAT on the last written block and if it can’t will try to revert the media to a previous state, before the corruption occurred by placing at the the end of the disk the last valid VAT.

Windows PowerShell
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> cmd
Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.17134.165]
(c) 2018 Microsoft Corporation. Με επιφύλαξη κάθε νόμιμου δικαιώματος.

C:\WINDOWS\system32>chkdsk /f e:
The type of the file system is UDF.
Volume Μουσική is UDF version 2.01.

Chkdsk is running on media that does not support writes in place.
On such media chkdsk operation is limited to verifying the presence
of a valid VAT on the last written block and if necessary searching
for the last valid VAT and placing it at the end of the disk.
This could revert the media to a previous state before the corruption
occured.

Chkdsk could not find a valid VAT at the end of the volume.

CHKDSK is searching for a valid VAT …

And after some ages (stayed at 0% for some time and then took around a day progressing slowly on my machine for a DVD) you’ll hopefully see something like:

Search for VAT completed.
Chkdsk is copying last valid VAT at block 1722719 to the end of the
volume. This will revert the volume to its state at 01:13 on
10/09/2018.

Windows has made corrections to the file system.
No further action is required.

   4595200 KB total disk space.
    222240 KB available on disk.

      2048 bytes in each allocation unit.
   2297600 total allocation units on disk.
    111120 allocation units available on disk.

Then type exit followed by ENTER key twice to exit the command processor (cmd) and PowerShell. This will close the console window.

C:\WINDOWS\system32>exit
PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> exit

Enjoy your disk with its files again, hopefully all of them… Plus you’ll be able to add more files to the disk, which could have even been near to empty when the corruption had occurred. Note that when you’re finished and don’t want to write anymore files to the disk, you can right click it and close the session, so that it can be readable on more systems.

HowTo: include MVC model property Display name in Required validation message

Just came across this validation error display in an MVC app I’ve recently started maintaining. The required input field validation seemed to not be localized, resulting in a mixed English and Greek (from the field’s Display name) message:

image

Looking at the MVC model I noticed they were using [Required] attributes for the userName and password properties, together with [Display(Name = "…")] for the displayed property title

public class LoginModel
  {
     [Required]
     [Display(Name = "Όνομα Χρήστη")]
     public string userName { get; set; }

     [Required]
     [DataType(DataType.Password)]
     [Display(Name = "Κωδικός")]
     public string password { get; set; }

     //…

That was changed to:

public class LoginModel
  {
     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Το {0} είναι απαραίτητο.")]
     [Display(Name = "Όνομα Χρήστη")]
     public string userName { get; set; }

     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Το {0} είναι απαραίτητο.")]
     [DataType(DataType.Password)]
     [Display(Name = "Κωδικός")]
     public string password { get; set; }

resulting in a fully localized validation error message with the respective property’s Display name auto-inserted in the validation ErrorMessage, thanks to the {0} used in the message string:

image

Note there’s also the lazy route like in this property:

[Display(Name = "Περίοδος Εγγύησης(Έτη):")]
[Required(ErrorMessage = "Απαραίτητο πεδίο")]
public int warrantyPeriod { get; set; }

where you just say something like “Required field” in the localized error message. This however will work only when you always show the error message next to the input field that fails to pass validation.

If you want to also show a validation summary say at the beginning and/or the end of the page (depending on where your submit button is), you’ll end up with an error summary that may just contain multiple entries of “Required field” text without any indication on what field it was (which would be practically useless that is).

Note that sometimes due to lack of space in a webpage (say if you have lots of input fields in a grid) you can only show say red “*” near input fields that have validation errors and explain them more in the tooltips and in an error summary control.

Even better you can use resource strings to avoid error message string duplication. That approach, though a bit more verbose as implemented in ASP.net means easier centralized maintenance and localization from a per locale/language resource file and less typos or slightly different error messages for the same thing. See example and related screenshots at https://stackoverflow.com/a/22849638

HowTo: Download and install Windows Live Movie Maker

Unfortunately, Microsoft seems to have gone to extra lenghts to make the Windows Live suite of software go away, without anyone thinking that there were people who were using them and without offering file/project-level compatible replacements for user-friendly tools like Windows Live Movie Maker.

Only Windows Live Writer was at some point reincarnated as the Open Live Writer opensource software at http://openlivewriter.org/. Hope Microsoft will do the same at some point (some community pressure and offer for opensource work on it would help of course) with Windows Live Movie Maker at least. I’ve seen that one used by educators since it’s very user friendly. It is a pitty to force them to throw away their older student projects when they get a new machine (I’m not aware of any video editing tool that can import Windows Live Movie Maker’s XML-based project file [.wlmp]).

Luckily, people have managed to locate the latest archived versions of the offline software installers (obviously the web installers won’t work anymore) for various languages (need to pick the same language as the one your OS UI is displaying in) at the Internet Wayback Machine (arthive.org) website.

Copy-pasting the links (they point to archived versions at archive.org) for the latest version released (build 16.4.3528.0331, April 17, 2014) below (in case Microsoft decides to make that discussion thread disappear too in the future) from:

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windowslive/forum/moviemaker-wlinstall/what-to-do-before-movie-maker-goes-away-jan-10/8b3a5345-7840-4a2c-922a-cf24d10771f7?page=2&msgId=7fbd8015-d7af-44ed-b81d-0d73e8abac45

as posted by the user “considerate_guy

updated links to the Archive.org copies of the *latest* versions (build 16.4.3528.0331)

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