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Posts Tagged ‘Windows’

Fix: Temporary or Local roaming profile message after Windows login

  Researching how to solve a “You have been logged on with a temporary profile” message on a system set up to use a roaming profile (and after I had first checked/fixed the filesystem for errors which is the classic cause for that when using local profiles) I came across this article:

http://www.grouppolicy.biz/2011/07/how-to-reset-a-roaming-profile-in-windows-7

Near the end of the article they mentioned a registry trick from

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/5ec0b949-effa-4e30-ba09-dc948a4c7a8b/windows-7-starting-with-a-temporary-profile?forum=w7itprogeneral

So I tried just the registry trick without even logging into an other admin account (it was an admin account that had the problem, although I know people suggest to avoid roaming for those), that is I renamed the account’s profile key under HKLM\Windows NT\Current Version\ProfileList with an appended .bak extension (instead of backing it up externally and then deleting it) and then did log off and log on again.

To find the correct child key to rename, just check each one there and see which one has the ProfileImagePath value for the profile you’re interested in. If for the login you’re using a Microsoft account instead of a local or ActiveDirectory based one and you’re not sure which name it uses underneath, then you can type the text %userprofile% at Search on the taskbar and press ENTER to see which folder path it opens.

  All was then fine on that machine, but then the rest of the computers that were fine before started complaining that due to some problem with loading the roaming profile they loaded a local copy of it instead.

The fix I devised for that issue was to log into those computers with the problematic account, rename the key for the profile again there (adding the .bak extension), log off and log on again, then rename the key back to normal and log off and log on again. That stopped the complaining (simple log off/log on without that renaming wouldn’t fix it).

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Guess what that did was to not load the roaming profile, but keep referencing it while using the local copy instead and the log off after the renaming of the key to correct value again uploaded the correct profile (from the local copy) to the server.

Note that to open regedit and restore that key’s name after logging in the 2nd time (start menu and taskbar’s search wasn’t working anymore) I had to use CTRL+SHIFT+ESC (was on a remote desktop session) and at the task manager select to see more details, then use its File/Run… menu and give regedit as the command to execute.

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  Btw, I’ve also seen the Reprofiler tool being mentioned, probably it can copy the roaming profile over a local copy or vice-versa if needed – https://iwrconsultancy.co.uk/reprofilerhttps://sourceforge.net/projects/reprofiler/ without having to resort to registry hacks to trick the respective service into copying in the direction one wants.

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Fix: Windows Update 0x8e5e03fa, 0x800703fa errors

Sometime ago, I was receiving errors 0x8e5e03fa and 0x800703fa on several pending updates at Windows 10’s Update pane (found at Settings / Updates & Security / Windows Update from the Start menu).

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The updates history wasn’t showing many more details, but could see Knowldege Base article numbers (KBxx) for some pending cummulative updates.

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Trying to update some graphics drivers from the Device Manager (can access that by right clicking the Start menu button and selecting “Device Manager” from the popup menu shown on Windows 10), by right-clicking respective devices and selecting to update their drivers, was also failing.

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So it did look like a systematic issue, not some issue with some specific update item.

Looked up the error code 0x8e5e03fa via Google and found this article mentioning a JET (database engine) error. That’s the same engine used in Access if I remember well, interesting that it’s getting used by Windows Update too (probably to maintain some private database).

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The suggested fix didn’t work since the file mentioned in that article was not existing, but at that folder (%windir%\system32\catroot2) I found a dberr.txt file that obviously was holding some error log.

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Printing out that file (can use TYPE dberr.txt | more to wait after each “page”), I couldn’t help but notice that it was writing JET error all over it.

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I renamed that file (think it was then recreated again automatically) and also renamed the two folders there (using the move command – e.g. can type move, press TAB till the name of the folder appears and then add a minus sign and press TAB again till the same folder name appears and press ENTER). Did that while having the cryptsvc service stopped (using net stop cryptsvc command) as that article suggested. Then started the service again (using net start cryptsvc). 

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After doing this, all failing updates (some extra driver updates had been found using DriverBooster, but were also failing to install) eventually installed fine and Windows 10 started bringing more updates:

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Redirecting output of batch file from the inside

Calling a label in a batch file is useful to redirect (for logging) the output of the batch file to a file from inside that same batch file, without needing to author a separate batch file to do the redirect of standard output.

@echo off

call :process > update_cxml.log
goto :EOF

:process

(Revised previous version of this post)

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Suggestion: Add Fullscreen and Pin buttons on Titlebar of Windows

Here are some suggestions I’ve sent via Windows Insider feedback app for Windows 10:

1) Add the Fullscreen button to titlebar of ALL windows, not just the ones of Windows 8.1 Store apps. UWP (Universal Windows Platform) apps don’t seem to show zoom button on their titlebar (to make it and any borders autodisappear and take up the whole screenspace) – this is very inconsistent and limiting compared to Win8.1 Store apps.

2) Add a Pin button next to zoom/minimize/restore/close buttons on titlebar of a window to make the window stay on top. User should be able to click a pinned window to bring it to front if there are several ones pinned to top. Currently some tools apps (e.g. task manager) have such functionality, but it is in their menus. It would be handy if all apps had this.
 
Take care though that any windows that are children (modal or not) of a pinned window also appear on top (pinned) and not behind the app. So a user should be able to pin a child window independently, but when a window is pinned, all its child windows should become pinned with the pin button disabled on them till the parent window is unpinned, or instead better make the pin of the child window be linked to the pin of the parent so that the user can pin/unpin the parent and all child windows from the titlebar pin of anyone of them.

An issue may occur with some programs like TeamViewer that add an extra button on the titlebar of Windows, but they could easily fix their code to see what other buttons there are on the titlebar to not overlap with them (or some compatibility code of Windows could move such buttons a bit more to not overlap in the case of legacy software that has an issue when more buttons than they expect are on the titlebar)

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Managed .NET Speech API links

(this is my answer at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14771474/voice-recognition-in-windows)

I’m looking into adding speech recognition to my fork of Hotspotizer Kinect-based app (http://github.com/birbilis/hotspotizer)

After some search I see you can’t markup the actionable UI elements with related speech commands in order to simulate user actions on them as one would expect if Speech input was integrated in WPF. I’m thinking of making a XAML markup extension to do that, unless someone can point to pre-existing work on this that I could reuse…

The following links should be useful:

http://www.wpf-tutorial.com/audio-video/speech-recognition-making-wpf-listen/

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/uploadfile/mahesh/programming-speech-in-wpf-speech-recognition/

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rlucero/archive/2012/01/17/speech-recognition-exploring-grammar-based-recognition.aspx

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh855387.aspx (make use of Kinect mic array audio input)

http://kin-educate.blogspot.gr/2012/06/speech-recognition-for-kinect-easy-way.html

https://channel9.msdn.com/Series/KinectQuickstart/Audio-Fundamentals

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh855359.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396#Software_Requirements

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=27225

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=27226

http://www.redmondpie.com/speech-recognition-in-a-c-wpf-application/

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/55383/A-WPF-Voice-Commanded-Database-Management-Applicat

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/483347/Speech-recognition-speech-to-text-text-to-speech-a

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/uploadfile/nipuntomar/speech-to-text-in-wpf/

http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar/

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh361625(v=office.14).aspx

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh323806.aspx

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.speech.recognition.speechrecognitionengine.requestrecognizerupdate.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rlucero/archive/2012/02/03/speech-recognition-using-multiple-grammars-to-improve-recognition.aspx

Kinect for Xbox 360 and Kinect for Windows (KfW) v1 specs

Picture

JJ131033.k4w_sensor_2(en-us,IEB.10).png

picture

1) 3D Depth sensor (IR Emitter + IR Camera / Depth Sensor)

2) RGB camera (Color Sensor)

3) Microphone array

4) Tilt motor (for detecting floor and players in the playspace)

 

Kinect Specifications
Viewing angle Field of View (FoV): 43° vertical x 57° horizontal
Vertical tilt range ±27°
Frame rate (depth and color stream) 30 frames per second (FPS)
Audio format 16-kHz, 24-bit mono
pulse code modulation (PCM)
Audio input characteristics 4-microphone array
24-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC)
onboard signal processing (including acoustic echo cancellation & noise suppression)
Accelerometer characteristics 2G/4G/8G accelerometer configured for 2G range
1° accuracy detail limit
(can help detect when the sensor is in an unusual orientation)

 

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinect

https://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-360/kinect/kinect-sensor-components

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj131033.aspx

Fix: How to remove Trovigo.com, SearchProtect, restore Internet Options

Trovigo.com is an unwanted search engine hijacker that renders Internet Options of Windows / Internet Explorer inaccessible. To restore them on an older Windows XP installation, one way that I’ve found to work is to update Internet Explorer to a newer version, aka IE 8 (say via the embedded Windows Update facility or Microsoft Update website – http://update.microsoft.com)

The software is also probably related to a software (at least on the machine I was fixing) called "Search Protect", that is running a service and two other processes that one launches, that tries to stop you from killing it and from changing search engine option in the web browser. To remove that you can use Process Explorer from http://www.sysinternals.com:

  1. Right-click the SearchProtect service and select Suspend (do the same for the two other processes it uses) to freeze it (breaks into the process with the debugger).
  2. Right click the service node (that has the other two processes shown as children under it in the process tree) and select "Kill process tree".
  3. Go to %ProgramFiles% (usually C:\Program Files) using Windows Explorer address bar (or type this in Start/Run… dialog and press OK) and remove the folder "SearchProtect"
  4. Use free software like CCleaner (http://www.piriform.com) free edition (it has a tool to edit startup entries) or the really powerful Autoruns one to remove the now broken (since you deleted the software at step #3 references in various Windows settings that try to launch the SearchProtect software (Autoruns shows in yellow startup references to missing files, can right click and delete those entries).
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